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This is the "Page 8" page of the "USD Information Literacy Lessons" guide.
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USD Information Literacy Lessons  

The broad focus of these lessons is understanding sources of information, including examples that can help you learn how to access information sources at USD. Each lesson is dedicated to a specific element of information competency.
Last Updated: May 15, 2017 URL: http://libguides.usd.edu/infolit Print Guide RSS Updates

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Where to Find Information in Your Library

The best place to begin looking for information is at the Library homepage. The University Libraries provide you with access to a variety of resources, including paper, microfilm, audio, video, multimedia, and electronic items.

Type of Information Source Library Tool
 Background information  Encyclopedias (general and subject), other reference works (almanacs, dictionaries, handbooks, manuals, etc.) Library Catalog
Comprehensive information Books (monographs) Library Catalog
Current or up-to-date information Scholarly journals, magazines, newspapers A good search engine (e.g., Google Scholar
Additional current or up-to-date information WWW A good search engine (e.g., Google)

 

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