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This is the "Page 19" page of the "USD Information Literacy Lessons" guide.
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USD Information Literacy Lessons  

The broad focus of these lessons is understanding sources of information, including examples that can help you learn how to access information sources at USD. Each lesson is dedicated to a specific element of information competency.
Last Updated: Jan 4, 2017 URL: http://libguides.usd.edu/infolit Print Guide RSS Updates

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A Sample Search

Now that you know something about your topic, it's time to find comprehensive information in books. Using the Library Catalog, you can find books on your subject using the search terms Islam and terrorism. Try it!

Search the USD Libraries Online Catalog

Go to the Advanced Search for more search options.

  • Because of the scrutiny Islam is now receiving, the Library has a good number of current, informative books on the subject.
  • However, because of the length of time it takes to publish a good-quality book, monographs on current issues are usually out-of-date as soon as they are published. (Books that are published quickly are usually not of good quality.)
  • Use monographs for learning about the topic, but be aware that the information in them can be dated.

To update the information you've found in books, use periodical literature. You can find citations (and often full text) of articles in the Research Databases.

  • Because this is an interdisciplinary topic, you should consult several of the "multi-subject" databases located at the upper right hand corner of the Research Gateway page (e.g., Academic Search Premier, ProQuest, and Wilson Omnifile). Search using the key words Islam and terrorism in a Multi-subject database of your choice.
  • Note that the databases give you a great deal of full-text access to articles.

Now that you've done all of your research using Library resources, you're ready to search the Web. Use Islam and terrorism.

  • Using Google, you can find (too much) information on your topic. If you only look at the sites with .edu domain extensions, you'll be looking at much less material, and it will be of better quality. (Hint: Use the Advanced Search page of Google to limit your search by domain extensions)
  • Using the Librarian's Index to the Internet, you'll find relevant web sites on your topic. You'll bless Karen Schneider, the web mistress of lii.org!

At this point, you've discovered from high-quality, credible sources that traditional Islam doesn't condone terrorism or murder. You're finished!

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