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Scholarly Communication & Publishing: Data Management

Information concerning Open Access, copyright, predatory publishers, impact factors, altmetrics, author rights, public access policy and data management plans.

Data Management Resources

Data Management Plan Checklist

Think Long - Term

Document Your Plan 

Once you have created your data management plan, whether informally, or by creating a DMP, document your plan. Include your group's procedures for the following: 

  • Naming files 
  • Saving and backing up files 
  • Describing data files 
  • Version tracking 

Remember to create plan for knowledge transfer. Think ahead to someone leaving the group, or when your project changes hands. 

The FAIR Guiding Principles

Principles applied to both data and metadata: 

F - Findable 

A - Accessible

I -  Interoperable

R- Reusable

Data Management Plan

Having a data management plan is beneficial and in some cases required for scholarly research and publication. An effective DMP makes your published research easier to reuse and cite.  When formulating a data plan consider three things:

 1.Categorization

  • Source  (observational, experimental, situational, or compiled)
  • Format  (text, numeric, audiovisual, equipment outputs, models, code)
  • Stability (fixed, growing, revisable AND if revisable- will you need to keep track of data versions?)
  • Amount/Volume (How much data will be produced?)

2. File format

  •  The file format you choose for your data is a primary factor in someone else's ability to access it in the future.
  • Which file format will be best to manage, share, and preserve your data?
  • For example, perform data collection and/or analysis in Excel, but save as a CSV (comma separated value)


3. Persistent identifiers

  •  URLs, DOIs, etc.

Data Best Practices

Use descriptive and informative file names.          

Choose file formats that will ensure long-term access. 

 

Create metadata for every experiment or analysis run. 

Handle sensitive data in an appropriate manner.

De-identify data of PID, think about HIPAA compliance. 

 

 

 

Subject Guide

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Shelie Vacek
Contact:
Wegner Health Sciences Library
605-357-1319

Metadata Tools

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