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This is the "Page 24" page of the "USD Information Literacy Lessons" guide.
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USD Information Literacy Lessons  

The broad focus of these lessons is understanding sources of information, including examples that can help you learn how to access information sources at USD. Each lesson is dedicated to a specific element of information competency.
Last Updated: Jan 4, 2017 URL: http://libguides.usd.edu/infolit Print Guide RSS Updates

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Criteria for Evaluation: Accuracy, Completeness, and Objectivity/Bias

  • Is there any advertising on the page and if so, is it clearly differentiated from the informational content?
  • To what extent is the information intended to sway the opinion of the audience?
  • Are the goals of the author and/or publisher clearly stated?

The following information on the topic of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome appeared in several different search engines .

These are some of the key studies cited on this Web page. When looking at the complete URL, the question of bias regarding the information presented should be considered. This page from the Health Research for Women section used to be located on Wine Institute. Org's Web site. Since the site belongs to an organization that is obviously interested in  promoting the drinking of wine, the question of its objectivity is in doubt.  l

These studies are all cited with complete references which give them the appearance of authority. The question to ask is whether or not bias is affecting the way information about "pregnant women drinking wine" is being presented. kevin 

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